Like anyone else, I have favorite movie categories. Besides legal thrillers, I enjoy films about investigative reporting, especially when I know they are based on fact. As someone who has testified as a forensic economist, my interest in solving puzzles no doubt accounts (at least in part) for their appeal. Lately though, as I write my own thriller book (with hopes of a Hollywood call), I have been thinking a lot about plot and pacing. Ever an advocate for good preparation, I have been reading books about writing. I completed several workshops and also took notes while watching high-rated movies spun from books or articles such as “The Rainmaker,” “The Insider” andRead More →

Seth Godin is one of my favorites when it comes to snappy punditry. In a recent blog post entitled “Hot: A theory of propulsion,” he wisely pens that “Words on a page or on a screen are asleep, inert, doing nothing at all until they interact with you, the reader.” He continues with two more pearls. “That takes effort” and “Without motion, the words get moldy.” The notion that promoting a piece of work is important is neither new nor trivial. However, this author of eighteen books reminds writers once again that it is our responsibility to advocate for our creations. The good news isRead More →

Entertainment media was abuzz this weekend about the end of one popular series and the next installment of another. After six seasons, loose ends were neatly wrapped up for the British upstairs – downstairs crowd at Downton Abbey. A few hours earlier, Netflix offered up another round of U.S. political intrigue in the form of a fourth season of House of Cards. (The original House of Cards was a shorter production about UK politics that debuted in 1990.) While both shows interweave complex plots that involve a large cast of characters, the material is by far darker in the case of House of Cards. Indeed, some might find itRead More →